Further adventures in brewing

In June I tried my hand at brewing some mead.  I followed a fairly simple recipe, but I added a bit of sweet fern from the back yard (after doing some thorough checking to make sure that sweet fern is indeed safe to brew with).  I brewed the mead to the specified gravity in the carboy (big glass container), then bottled it and left it to condition in the bottles for a while.

One evening, E. and I were sitting watching tv when we heard a loud pop and the sound of shattering glass.  We got up to check and found that two of the mead bottles had exploded, sending a shower of glass shards all over the dining room and kitchen.  Fortunately, we were in another room.  I hate to think of what might have happened if we had been sitting at the dining table.

It took us an hour and a half to clean up the broken bottles.  I opened all the rest of the bottles and emptied their contents back into the carboy to ferment for a few more days before bottling them again.  So far so good.  No more burst bottles and we’ve been enjoying sweet fern mead.

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2 Responses to “Further adventures in brewing”

  1. Dave Bonta Says:

    How does it taste, and how much sweetfern did you use? I’ve added some to batches of beer in the past, but not enough, I think. Due to its cousinship with Myrica gale, a traditional gruit herb, I think it holds promise as a brewing additive.

    • heatherhouse Says:

      I used only a small amount, a small spring crushed up. It gave a nice, slightly spicy flavor to the mead. I’ll definitely use it again and I’ll use more next time.

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